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Why we ask for certain data from you – we’re not just being nosy!

When you sign up for market research and enter the validation process, you may be asked a number of questions relating to your everyday life. This is because we need to recruit the most relevant participants for our clients’ market research studies so that they can generate fair results.

The brands we work with often have very specific criteria when recruiting for their projects to ensure that they get the insights they need. However, we understand that it can seem a little strange to be asked more ‘personal’ questions before taking part in a market research study. Officially, this is known as ‘special category data’, which the GDPR says is more sensitive and, as such, needs more protection. This includes things like race, ethnic origin, religion, or genetics. To process this data, we adhere to strict conditions as part of the GDPR law.

This blog post will take you through some of the most common things we ask and why we ask them, ensuring we always abide by GDPR rules.

What is your financial situation?

When validating you for market research, we may ask about your yearly income, disposable income, and any debt you currently have. Of course, you are not obligated to answer this, but this information can be vital because it allows our clients to really understand their customers. Rest assured, your answers are used purely for market research purposes and will not be passed on to a third party.

We may also ask for your bank details for studies where payment is delivered by BACs so you can get paid for your time. Don’t worry, though – it is perfectly safe to give your account number and sort code as this information can only be used to pay money INTO your account. You could also get your incentive in the form of an Amazon voucher, depending on the methodology.

On occasions, you may be asked about your financial situation will help us to match you to our client’s criteria and to ensure that we are representing a certain audience fairly. Once again, you don’t have to answer this but if you don’t, we may not be able to take you forward for the research study. We will always give you a breakdown of the type of information we are storing, how long it will be stored for, as well as details of any third parties, and a clear indication of how they will process data.

What is your political affiliation?

Again, when you sign up for market research and move through the validation process, we may ask for your political affiliation. This can seem a little odd, however, we do this because our client needs to reflect their demographic as closely as possible or else the opinions could become irrelevant. To give an example, if a brand knows that their eco-friendly product is purchased by people who support the Green Party, which has strong environmental values, interviewing people who don’t support this party would not give a good insight into what their target audience really think.

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What is your sexual orientation?

We may ask for your sexual orientation or your opinion on LGBTQ+ and feminist issues to ensure an equal representation is acquired for the market research study. Everyone should have a voice in market research to get their opinions heard.

How would you describe your ethnicity?

We believe that diversity within market research is really important. Making sure that everyone is equally represented is vital to any market research study in order to produce the best outcomes, whilst conducting research with respondents who have a wide range of different backgrounds also ensures brands don’t make avoidable mistakes.

Who is living in your current household?

We may ask you who you live with and what their occupations are (if applicable). This is to assess whether you are part of the demographic our client is looking to recruit. For example, a brand may want to conduct a market research study with parents whose kids still live at home with them.

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What are your purchasing habits?

This question is asked to find out whether you are a customer of the brand we are working for to ensure an equal representation. Often, this information won’t be provided on your market research invitation so that we can recruit both customers and non-customers for our client. With this question, honesty is always the best policy as you don’t always need to be an existing customer to take part in the research.

As well as this, the brand may be conducting research on their competitors to understand their market better as a whole. In which case, this question is asked to assess why you may choose one product over another.

What is your address/where do you live?

Some market research studies involve an in-home interview, which is where a researcher comes to your house to see how you use a particular product within your day-to-day life, asking you questions as you go. So, in this case, we will need to provide an address for the researcher to go to.

Another reason we ask for your address is so that we can represent a particular audience from a particular area. For example, our client may wish to conduct research with 25-35 year olds from Manchester.

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What are your social media account details?

We may ask for your social media username (such as your Twitter handle) as it could relate to the inclusion criteria provided by our client. For example, if a brand wanted to conduct market research with people who regularly post on social media, we would need to ask you if you’re active. In order to ensure that all our research is conducted fairly, we ask this question to be able to verify the most active social media users.

Equality in recruitment

All in all, we only ask these questions so that we can get a fair representation of respondents for our clients, who often have very specific criteria. We need to recruit those who use the brand’s product or service and who also fit a particular demographic.GDPR applies to every organisation, including market research and fieldwork agencies, so we always handle data sensitively and transparently. Each individual has certain rights when it comes to sharing data with us, including the right to object, the right to be informed, and the right to erasure, which we always respect. If you have any further information about the questions we may ask once you sign up for market research and the data we acquire, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Sign Up Here.

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5 Steps to Reducing Plastic Waste

We’ve all seen the upsetting images of plastic items clogging up the oceans and damaging natural wildlife. And, with plastic production expected to increase by 40% over the next decade, the consequences of this shocking prospect could be devastating. Recycling alone is not enough to solve this crisis, so, what can you do to help reduce your plastic waste? Often, it’s more about the little things you can adopt in order to make small changes. After all, a lot of people doing something little is better than a few doing a lot.

To have your say in the way brands market and package their products, you can take part in market research. Your opinions are highly valued and you will get paid for your time. For those wishing to take part from the comfort of their own home, there’s even the option to share your opinions and make extra money online, too. In the meantime, check out these five simple ways to reduce your plastic waste…

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1. Take reusable shopping bags to the supermarket

Remember when plastic shopping bags were free? Not that long ago, we wouldn’t think twice about packing our weekly shop away in single-use plastic bags. But, since the plastic bag charge came into place in England in 2015, there has been a huge 85% drop in their use. They now cost 5p-10p each – hardly breaking the bank – yet this initiative has been really effective.

Many of us now use our own reusable shopping bags on our trips to the supermarket. But let’s go one step further. With so many products inside the store, such as loose fruit, still requiring you to use plastic produce bags, why not invest in some reusable storage bags, too? This way, you’ll save even more on plastic.

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2. Use refill stations

With eight million tonnes of plastic dumped in our oceans every year, the rate of our plastic waste is growing at an alarming rate. To help make one small change, why not try refilling your hand soap, laundry liquid, or washing-up liquid at your local Ecover refill station, rather than throwing away old bottles? Ecover produce 100% recyclable bottles that you can refill more than 50 times at these local stations.

Available at most UK supermarkets, Ecover bottles package washing-up liquid, laundry liquid, household cleaning products, and hand soap. They are the first major brand to implement a nationwide scheme like this, but with more and more refill shops popping up nationwide, it’s only a matter of time before other brands get on board and start offering the same service!

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3. Save money by using your own coffee cup

Takeaway coffee is so convenient when you’re on the go. However, we’re throwing away 2.5 billion coffee cups here in the UK, let alone the rest of the world. That’s 5,000 every minute. What are we doing?! Let’s make one small change by simply taking a reusable coffee cup with us wherever we go.

You can even get collapsible ones that don’t take up room in your bag! Many coffee chains, such as Costa Coffee, Starbucks and Pret A Manger even give you a discount if you bring your own cup, so you can save those extra pennies, too. Boston Tea Party has gone one step further and completely banned single-use cups – now that’s progression.

4. Stay clear of plastic straws and toothbrushes

With an estimated 8.5 billion plastic straws thrown away each year in the UK, it’s clear we still have a long way to go. Plastic straws are not recyclable and don’t decompose, and they also lead to long-term pollution of our land and oceans, clogging up waterways and harming wildlife.

UK consumers are the second biggest users per person of single-use straws compared with other European countries. But, with companies such as Final Straw selling reusable, collapsible straws that you can take with you anywhere you go, there are now more sustainable alternatives. There are also other reusable straws on the market, so you don’t have to buy single-use plastic ones ever again! Just making this one small change can lead to such positive results.

But that’s not all. We use 3.6 billion plastic toothbrushes every year, most ending up in our oceans and polluting the natural ecosystem. Fish and sealife don’t need to keep their teeth clean! Plastic in our oceans has huge consequences, not to mention the disruption to marine life. As an alternative, Humble Brush have manufactured toothbrushes that are made out of bamboo. Working with dentists, these brushes are not only good for your dental hygiene, but they also decompose in just 6 months in a household compost bin. They also make eco-friendly cotton buds and toothpaste, too, if you want to go the extra mile!

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5. Get your milk delivered

Another way you could reduce your plastic consumption is by getting your milk delivered in glass bottles from your local milkman. Okay, it might be a little more expensive than just popping to the shops to grab a bottle, but it’s worth considering, especially if you’d save on petrol. Plus, you’d be supporting your local milk farm.

Between 1975 and 2015, the amount of milk sold in glass bottles shrank by a huge 90%. Switching to plastic meant that we now use about 13 billion plastic bottles a year, including milk and other drinks and toiletries. That’s 200 bottles per person in the country, every year. So even if we just switch our milk bottles, and nothing else, we’ll have a great positive impact on the environment. You can find your nearest milkman here – let’s bring back the good old milk round.

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Let’s spark change

David Attenborough’s Blue Planet 2 was the most-watched TV programme in 2017, highlighting the effect our plastic waste is having on marine life. It sparked a change in people’s way of thinking, making many of us think twice about our plastic consumption. We still have a long way to go, but just by implementing these small changes into your day-to-day life, you can do your bit for the world. We just need to get the ball rolling! The government’s Resources and Waste Strategy is definitely a step in the right direction, but we all need to work together now to help the future.

So, now that you know how to reduce plastic waste, what are you going to do to minimise your impact on the environment?

At Angelfish Opinions, you can voice your thoughts and opinions to well-known brands by taking part in market research. You can have a direct impact on the way a product is packaged, launched, priced or marketed. Plus, you can make extra money online if you’d like to work it around your personal life. Want to get involved? Sign up to our panel today to start getting invitations to relevant studies.

Sign Up Here.

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